3 thoughts on “Slapewath Fatality – Joseph Curry – 01 Aug 1877

  1. From The Daily Gazette of 2nd August 1877
    SHOCKING ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY NEAR GUISBOROUGH
    On Wednesday, about noon, a sad accident occurred on the Cleveland Mineral Railway, near Guisbro’. The unfortunate man, a fireman named John Curry, was, with two others, T. Bennett (engineman) and J. Usher (guard), in charge of a goods train from Middlesbrough to Brotton, and, on reaching Slapewath, where a few waggons had to be left, he went to open the points of the siding into which the waggons had to be shunted. In going round the end waggon, he stumbled and fell across one of the rails, and before he could recover himself the waggons which had been put in motion were upon him, and one of the wheels passed over his leg and grazed the other. The engineman heard his cries, and stopped the train. The poor fellow was immediately conveyed on a light engine to the Guisborough Railway Station, and thence removed to the Miners’ Hospital, where he was promptly attended by Dr Messenger. The left leg was so badly crushed that amputation above the knee was found necessary. The other did not appear to been seriously injured. The unfortunate man had, however, received such a shock to his system that he gradually sank after the operation, and expired about two hours after his admission into the hospital. The deceased was a married man, about thirty years of age, and resided at Middlesbrough.

    From The Daily Gazette of 3rd August 1877
    THE FATAL RAILWAY ACCIDENT NEAR GUISBOROUGH
    On Thursday morning, Mr W. Robinson, deputy-coroner, held an inquest at the Miners’ Hospital, Guisborough, on the body of Joseph Curry, 35, fireman, who had died from injuries received on the Cleveland Mineral Railway on the previous day. The deceased, as already stated in our columns, was shunting a waggon at Slapewath, when he was accidentally knocked down by the buffer of the waggon and run over. He was removed to the hospital, where he was attended by Dr Messenger, but he died about two hours after admission. No blame was attached to anyone, and Mrs Stones, matron, having stated that everything was done to save the unfortunate man’s life, the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.” The jurymen gave their fees to the widow of the deceased.

  2. I do wonder whether this poor fella was a Cleveland railway fireman,as I thought by 1877 the Cleveland had been taken over by the NER and the railway west of guisborough closed
    Also with it saying that a light engine took him to Guisborough station means that the Cleveland had been connected to the Middlesbrough’ and Guisborough branch which by then was NE
    Was the connection between them a deviation or was there actually a junction before the Cleveland closed

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